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"Arts Index" Spurs Discussion, Questions

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By Stephanie Kaye

A new "arts index" could change the way people view arts role in society. The index, created by the group "Americans for the Arts," attempts to back up belief with fact. Randy Cohen, a Vice President with the nonprofit, spoke at the National Press Club.

"What's treasured is measured. If something's important to us, we want to know as much about it as we can learn," says Cohen.

Bob Lynch heads up Americans for the Arts.

"The arts continue to be important as an investment in community development and spiritual development of the people in the communities in the D.C. area and throughout the nation," says Lynch.

Arthur Brooks is the president of the American Enterprise Institute.

"We don't regret the fact that restaurants that aren't competitive have to close. We DO regret somehow the idea that a non-competitive arts non-profit might need to go away," says Brooks.

As the study begins to spur questions, Americans for the Arts hopes the index helps inform the conversation.

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