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Community Service Influences Generations To Come

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By Kavitha Cardoza

More than 30,000 volunteers participated in community service projects in the District to honor Martin Luther King Jr. And in some cases, the effects of all that effort will be enjoyed for years to come.

Evan Waldt is painting a column in the cafeteria of Ron Brown Middle School...bright orange.

"It's just really nice I think to brighten up an area of your day when you're eating," says Waldt.

Other volunteers are building bookshelves, landscaping and creating more than 25 murals on school walls. Waldt says he imagines the looks on children's faces when they enter their colorful school.

"A kid walking in here and says you know what? There's no reason for me to do graffiti now cause now there are these beautiful murals. Someone out there cares about me," he says.

Jeffrery Franco with City Year, helped organize the effort. He says this isn't just about the project, it's also about the people.

"To see people from diverse backgrounds, come together to work together is a very positive symbol for a community that does care," says Franco.

More than 600 volunteers helped out at the school.


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