: News

Region's Charter Bus Traffic Could Double

Play associated audio
The American Bus Association predicts bus traffic in the D.C. area will more than double in the next four years.
Selena Simmons-Duffin
The American Bus Association predicts bus traffic in the D.C. area will more than double in the next four years.

By David Schultz

You might be seeing more of those giant charter buses around town in the coming years, not just charter buses, but all private buses.That includes commuter shuttles and the buses that go to New York.

The American Bus Association, or ABA, predicts the business they generate in the D.C. region could more than double in the next four years.

But more business means more buses, and that means bus parking is going to become very scarce.

"Parking is always a challenge," says Pete Pantuso, the ABA's president. "And we continue to work with all of the governments in the Washington D.C. Baltimore Virginia jurisdictions to see if we can't find places to put buses when they come to town."

Pantuso says the bus industry often thrives during recessions as travelers look for lower-cost ways to get where they're going.

NPR

Tampa Hosts Bollywood's Biggest Stars At Annual Awards Show

India's Bollywood film industry is increasingly reaching a world-wide audience. To highlight the international appeal, the industry holds its annual awards ceremony every year outside of India.
NPR

Got My Goat? Vermont Farms Put Fresh Meat On Refugee Tables

Americans don't eat much barbecued goat, but the meat is a mainstay in many African, Asian and Caribbean diets. In Vermont, farmers raise for refugees and immigrants, with hopes to mainstream it.
WAMU 88.5

On National Mall, Native Americans Protest Keystone XL Pipeline

Native Americans from across the country are visiting Washington this week to protest the construction of a controversial pipeline in the Midwest.
NPR

Life Outside The Fast Lane: Startups Wary Of Web Traffic Plan

The Federal Communications Commission's proposal would let Web companies pay for faster access. But entrepreneurs, like Reddit's co-founder, are wondering how they would have fared with such rules.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.