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Region's Charter Bus Traffic Could Double

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The American Bus Association predicts bus traffic in the D.C. area will more than double in the next four years.
Selena Simmons-Duffin
The American Bus Association predicts bus traffic in the D.C. area will more than double in the next four years.

By David Schultz

You might be seeing more of those giant charter buses around town in the coming years, not just charter buses, but all private buses.That includes commuter shuttles and the buses that go to New York.

The American Bus Association, or ABA, predicts the business they generate in the D.C. region could more than double in the next four years.

But more business means more buses, and that means bus parking is going to become very scarce.

"Parking is always a challenge," says Pete Pantuso, the ABA's president. "And we continue to work with all of the governments in the Washington D.C. Baltimore Virginia jurisdictions to see if we can't find places to put buses when they come to town."

Pantuso says the bus industry often thrives during recessions as travelers look for lower-cost ways to get where they're going.

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