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New Teaching Standards Will Help Teachers With Non-English Speaking Students

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By Kavitha Cardoza

The State Board of Education is expected to approve a blueprint for teachers so they will be clear on what non-English speaking students are expected to know based on their fluency in English.

There are almost 6,000 children in D.C. Public Schools who don't speak English fluently. And their teachers say it isn't just the spoken language they have difficulty with, it's also learning "academic" English.

"Each subject area has it's own jargon and it's own lingo, which is difficult for anyone to pick up," says Karen Wesley, a teacher with H.D. Cooke Elementary. "The technical language is always harder."

Teachers say they use creative ways to communicate with these students including acting out lessons, using pictures and simplifying words.


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The Politics Hour - October 28, 2016

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