D.C. Charter Schools See Five Percent Decrease In Graduation Rate | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

D.C. Charter Schools See Five Percent Decrease In Graduation Rate

Play associated audio

By Kavitha Cardoza

The 2009 graduation rate for D.C.public charter schools is above the national average of 69 percent but still saw a five percent decrease from the previous academic year.

The charter school graduation rate dropped from 88 to 83 percent. Josephine Baker is the Executive Director of the Public Charter School board. She says the decrease may be because in 2007, seven high schools moved under their control. Baker speculates they may have kept statistics differently.

"It may have taken them a year to be as precise as we would want them to be," she says.

Baker says the emphasis won't be on figuring out reasons for the decrease, it'll be on improving how charter schools keep records.

"Let's say there were schools that did not accurately record where students went," she says. "If they put nothing down, that student is considered a dropout."

The graduation rate for traditional public schools is 72 percent. That marked an increase of three percent over the previous academic year.

NPR

Ladies Lead Whiskey Renaissance As Distillers And New Tipplers

Whiskey was long considered a man's drink. But as sales of whiskey soar, it's women who are leading the new boom, thanks to a vanguard of female distillers, blenders and tasters.
NPR

Ladies Lead Whiskey Renaissance As Distillers And New Tipplers

Whiskey was long considered a man's drink. But as sales of whiskey soar, it's women who are leading the new boom, thanks to a vanguard of female distillers, blenders and tasters.
NPR

Transcript: President Obama's Full NPR Interview

Steve Inskeep's wide-ranging interview with President Obama covers recent executive actions on Cuba and immigration, race relations in the U.S., health care and extending democracy in the Middle East.
NPR

Die-In, Vortex, Selfie Stick: What's The Word Of 2014?

In January, members of the American Dialect Society will vote on the 2014 Word of the Year. Linguist Ben Zimmer runs through some contenders — including words both old and new.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.