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Kaine Delivers Final Speech As Governor

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By Jonathan Wilson

Virginia's outgoing governor says the state should be proud of continuing economic success, but also challenged state lawmakers to find more money for transportation.

In his final speech as governor, Democrat Tim Kaine told Virginia legislators the state continues to attract more business than almost any other part of the country, despite tough economic times.

"No state in America has enjoyed the success that we have seen in recent years," says Kaine.

And a good bit of that success has found its way to Northern Virginia Fairfax County Board of Supervisors. Chair Sharon Bulova says Kaine deserves much of the credit.

"We've seen five Fortune 500 companies come to the state, including four in Fairfax County, so we have much to be thankful for and grateful for," says Bulova.

But Bulova's colleague on the board, Michael Frey, calls Kaine a classy governor, but one who didn't accomplish very much.

"The biggest failure, in my opinion was his complete inability to address transportation," says Frey.

In his speech, Kaine said he failed to convince lawmakers that more state money needs to be spent roads and highways.

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