D.C. Parent Raises Awareness Of Special Education Services | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

D.C. Parent Raises Awareness Of Special Education Services

Play associated audio

By Jessica Gould

Special Education advocates are on a mission to link children in the district to the services they need.

Elizabeth Rihani spends her days canvassing the city for three-year-olds.

"The schools, churches, community centers, libraries. Anybody who sees a three to five year old on a regular basis, we want to inform them about Early Stages and the services available," she says.

Rihani is a "Child Find" coordinator for Early Stages, a new testing facility in northwest D.C.

"The goal is to make sure that these children are identified early so that they can receive as many services as possible to help them get the strongest start to school," she says.

Rihani would know. Several years ago she noticed her daughter hadn't started walking, even though her peers had. Eventually, Rihani got the help she needed, and she wants to make sure other children have the same opportunity to succeed.

"I had this other experience with my child, and I wanted to be part of it," says Rihani.

Located at Walker Jones Education Campus, Early Stages offers free evaluations to children ages 3 to 5.

NPR

A Puzzle With Everything, Including The Kitchen Sink

Each word provided is an anagram of something you might see in a kitchen. For example, "skin" is an anagram of "sink."
NPR

'Into The Wild' Author Tries Science To Solve Toxic Seed Mystery

Jon Krakauer has long been haunted by how Christopher McCandless died in the Alaskan wilderness. In a scientific journal, he and a chemist show that the seeds McCandless consumed can contain a toxin.
NPR

5 Things You Should Know About Carly Fiorina

The former CEO of Hewlett-Packard once had a stint filing and typing for the company. She also dropped out of law school, survived breast cancer and once ran a campaign ad featuring demon sheep.
NPR

3-D Printers Bring Historic Instruments Back To The Future

You just can't stick a modern mouthpiece on an antique saxophone and get the right sound. The answer could be in the lab.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.