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At Howard University Hospital, Local Haitians Hope To Help

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By Patrick Madden

As aid teams from around the world rush to help the people of Haiti, some local Haitians say they wish they could do more.

At Dr. Daphne Bazile's office at Howard University Hospital, two cellphones rest on her desk. Bazile says she's trying to find out anything she can; so far she hasn't been able to reach her family back home in Haiti.

"It's one of those situations where no news is not good news," she says.

As a doctor, she knows exactly what sort of medical help is needed in Haiti right now.

"If there is a way for me to go and help that would be great, because I would be willing to do that--but the sad and realistic thought that a lot of us have is that we may have to go to bury loved ones," says Dr. Bazile.

Yollete Lamour has ended her shift at Howard University Hospital. She is one of three nurses on her floor from Haiti.

"Goodness! I wish I could just take the plane and go there and try to help the people out there and pull these people from the rubble and clean them up," she says.

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