Local Assistance For Haiti | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Local Assistance For Haiti

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By Sabri Ben-Achour

Search and rescue teams from Virginia's Fairfax County are going to Haiti to aid in the rescue effort there following the country's worst Earthquake in 200 years.

Seventy-two personnel and 48 tons of specialized equipment are headed for the airport. Fairfax County's urban search and rescue team is partnering with USAID to assist Haiti in the rescue effort.

"They are able to work in very tight confined spaces in buildings that have collapsed and they are able to locate people who might still be alive in the voids of collapsed buildings," says USAID's Rebecca Gustafson.

The only delay is finding an airport runway in Haiti that is in good enough condition for the equipment laden plane to land.

Gustafson recommends the Center for International Disaster Information to learn how best to donate.

There is also a Facebook group for people in the D.C. area who wish to donate, there are links there to charities working in Haiti.

The Red Cross is also accepting donations.

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