Neil DeGrasse Tyson Selected As Earth Sky Science Communicator Of The Year | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

Neil DeGrasse Tyson Selected As Earth Sky Science Communicator Of The Year

Play associated audio

Astrophysicist Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson has been named Earth Sky Science Communicator of the Year for 2009.

Dr. Tyson is the Frederick P. Rose director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History in New York and has hosted PBS's educational television show NOVA Science NOW since 2006. He's also been a frequent guest on The Daily Show, The Colbert Report, and other programs.

Earth Sky is a media organization that provides platforms for scientists to speak about 21rst century scientific issues.

Earth Sky is featuring Dr. Tyson in an eight-minute Earth Sky Clear Voices for Science podcast, speaking on the importance of science in creating an informed U.S. electorate. Listen to the podcast: Neil deGrasse Tyson: 'Learning how to think is empowerment' below.

The Earth Sky Science Communicator of the Year award was established in 2008. The 2008 winner was Dr. James Hansen, a physicist, who heads the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City. Dr. Hansen is an expert on climate change.

NPR

Best Seat In The House Of Worship: The Temple Hollywood Built

Built in the late 1920s by movie moguls, the Wilshire Boulevard Temple is a Los Angeles landmark — and also a statement the LA Jewish community made to itself, and to the city.
NPR

Red Robin's 'Monster' Burger Wins Xtreme Eating Awards

The Center for Science in the Public Interest says, at more than 3,500 calories, it's the "single unhealthiest" meal among 200 chain restaurants.
WAMU 88.5

Jonnie Williams On Stand Again Today In McDonnell Corruption Trial

Former Star Scientific CEO Jonnie Williams will take the stand again today in the trial of former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell, and his testimony could be key in the case.

NPR

Can Pinterest Compete With Google's Search?

Pinterest has created a database of things that matter to humans. And with a programming team that's largely been hired away from Google, the company has begun offering what it calls "guided search."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.