Neil DeGrasse Tyson Selected As Earth Sky Science Communicator Of The Year | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Neil DeGrasse Tyson Selected As Earth Sky Science Communicator Of The Year

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Astrophysicist Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson has been named Earth Sky Science Communicator of the Year for 2009.

Dr. Tyson is the Frederick P. Rose director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History in New York and has hosted PBS's educational television show NOVA Science NOW since 2006. He's also been a frequent guest on The Daily Show, The Colbert Report, and other programs.

Earth Sky is a media organization that provides platforms for scientists to speak about 21rst century scientific issues.

Earth Sky is featuring Dr. Tyson in an eight-minute Earth Sky Clear Voices for Science podcast, speaking on the importance of science in creating an informed U.S. electorate. Listen to the podcast: Neil deGrasse Tyson: 'Learning how to think is empowerment' below.

The Earth Sky Science Communicator of the Year award was established in 2008. The 2008 winner was Dr. James Hansen, a physicist, who heads the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City. Dr. Hansen is an expert on climate change.

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