"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Monday, January 11, 2010 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Monday, January 11, 2010

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(January 11-February 12) SAINTS AND STORIES Saints and Fables arrive at the Waddell Art Gallery on the campus of Northern Virginia Community College in Sterling. These woodcut prints and sculptures depict seldom-told tales and saintly beings, imbuing glass, concrete and paper with a higher power. There's a gallery talk on Wednesday, January 20th, and a reception where you can meet the artist on Friday, January 22nd from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

(January 12) LINE IN THE SAND Speakeasy D.C.'s storytellers take a stand during Line in the Sand: Stories about making a point tomorrow night at Town Danceboutique in Northwest D.C. at 8 p.m. It's a night of true, and courageous, tales told live.

(Jan 12-Mar 7) MARRIED TO MYSELF Signature Theatre takes the plunge with I am My Own Wife opening tomorrow at the Shirlington, Virginia theater and running through March 7th. Inspired by interviews with the playwright, "I Am My Own Wife" tells the real-life story of Charlotte von Mahlsdorf, a German transvestite surviving Nazi rule and the repression of East Germany.

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