Nathan Saunders Wants To Be W.T.U. President | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Nathan Saunders Wants To Be W.T.U. President

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By Kavitha Cardoza

Nathan Saunders, the current vice president of the union that represents hundreds of teachers in D.C. Public Schools, says he wants the top spot. Saunders says the current president of the WTU George Parker isn't aggressive enough in fighting for teacher's rights.

Saunders says it's been almost three years since the teacher's contract expired and he criticized the union's response to the recent layoffs of more than 250 teachers. Saunders says he wants to build a union that's more proactive.

"Teachers are being asked to do more with less resources and more pressure, and being blamed for practically everything that doesn't work," says Saunders.

If Saunders wins, Chancellor Michelle Rhee would be negotiating with a new union president who has also been highly critical of many of her proposals, particularly her offer to pay teachers substantially more in exchange for tenure protections.

Parker's current term as president ends in May.

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