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H1N1 Gets Schooled

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A child prepares to get an H1N1 vaccination.
Sabri Ben-Achour
A child prepares to get an H1N1 vaccination.

By Sabri Ben-Achour

Children under 9 need a second dose of swine flu vaccine to be fully protected. Arlington County, Virginia is setting a national example by vaccinating children in school.

In a bustling gym at Carlin Springs elementary school, Volunteer Barbara Oliveri are preparing students to get the second round of swine flu vaccine

"Remember we're gonna put a squirt up one nostril and you're gonna sniff in like it's the most wonderful thing you can smell!" says Oliveri.

Asna - a kindergartner - was unimpressed by the taste.

"Yucky. A little bit like cereal," she says.

The vaccine is free, and giving it out at school means parents don't have to take off work. Kathleen Sebelius, Secretary of Health and Human Services,singled out Arlington as a model, one that other jurisdictions should follow and follow quickly, as flu season has only just begun.

"What we saw in the 50's was a disease that was robust and then seemed to be dying out and came back with a roar in the winter," says Sebelius.

60 percent of eligible children in Arlington county have been vaccinated through the schools.

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