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Fenty Urges Safety In Snow And Ice

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DDOT will use salt from the Farragut Street Salt Dome to keep streets safe in the snow and ice.
Rebecca Sheir
DDOT will use salt from the Farragut Street Salt Dome to keep streets safe in the snow and ice.

By Rebecca Sheir

After last nights winter weather, Mayor Adrian Fenty's administration is urging residents to stay safe.

Outside the Farragut Street Salt Dome in Northeast DC, a front-end loader spills salt into a pick-up truck. The truck is among 200 pieces of equipment the District's Department of Transportation has deployed to combat the snow and, as D-DOT director Gabe Klein points out, the eventual ice.

"We are looking at very cold temps as we head towards the weekend," says Klein. "And as we've seen from a lot of these storms, you can very quickly get a sheet of ice."

That's why Fenty is encouraging Washingtonians to take public transportation, and to shovel their walks early.

"Please don't wait for Friday night," says Fenty. "If you haven't shoveled it by then, it almost certainly will be very hazardous."

While the District is continuing its trash and recycling services today, it is suspending the leaf program, so leaf drivers can join the city's snow brigade.

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