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Improved Storm Tracking Means Earlier Predictions

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By Bill Redlin

People who live in coastal areas of Maryland and Virginia, or have interests there, will be getting the word on hurricanes sooner than in the past. Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center say improved storm tracking will allow them to issue storm warnings and watches about half a day earlier than in the past.

They hope warnings about 36 to 48 hours ahead of storms will give coastal residents more advance notice. However some local emergency officials, and the center, say the earlier warnings won't make much difference when it comes to ordering evacuations. Local officials sometimes order evacuations before the official warning is issued.

The Atlantic hurricane season begins June 1st.


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