Bag Bills Proposed For Maryland And Virginia | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Bag Bills Proposed For Maryland And Virginia

Play associated audio

Less than a week after D.C.'s bag law took effect, two politicians in Maryland and Virginia have started ginning up support to carry the concept across state lines. Like the District's law, the Maryland and Virginia proposals would charge 5 cents for paper or plastic bags from grocery, drug, liquor and convenience stores. And like the District, most of the money collected would go to environmental clean-up.

Virginia Delegate Adam Ebbin, a Democrat from the Washington suburbs, says that plastic bags are one of the biggest polluters of waterways, and that paper bags are even less environmentally sound.

And Maryland Delegate Alfred Carr, a democrat from Montgomery County, says you don't have to look far to see how bad the pollution is: "Last April my two sons and I volunteered on a voluntary cleanup of Rock Creek, and the volunteers collected over seven thousand plastic retail bags."

Carr and Ebbin hope the District's new law will provide momentum for theirs. But it's not the first time they've tried. Last year similar bills in Maryland and Virginia died in committee.

NPR

Sen. Mitch McConnell's Political Life, Examined, In 'The Cynic'

When journalist Alec MacGillis started looking into McConnell's early politics, he says he was "startled" by how moderate the Republican used to be. The book traces McConnell's shift to the right.
NPR

Soda Companies Step Up Their Marketing To Black And Latino Kids

Black youth saw more than twice as many ads for sugary drinks on TV compared with white children and teens in 2013. Advertising for the drinks on Spanish-language TV also increased by 44 percent.
NPR

Sen. Mitch McConnell's Political Life, Examined, In 'The Cynic'

When journalist Alec MacGillis started looking into McConnell's early politics, he says he was "startled" by how moderate the Republican used to be. The book traces McConnell's shift to the right.
NPR

Keep Your Head Up: 'Text Neck' Takes A Toll On The Spine

Newly published research finds that common texting posture can put as much as 60 pounds of force on the cervical spine.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.