: News

Bag Bills Proposed For Maryland And Virginia

Play associated audio

Less than a week after D.C.'s bag law took effect, two politicians in Maryland and Virginia have started ginning up support to carry the concept across state lines. Like the District's law, the Maryland and Virginia proposals would charge 5 cents for paper or plastic bags from grocery, drug, liquor and convenience stores. And like the District, most of the money collected would go to environmental clean-up.

Virginia Delegate Adam Ebbin, a Democrat from the Washington suburbs, says that plastic bags are one of the biggest polluters of waterways, and that paper bags are even less environmentally sound.

And Maryland Delegate Alfred Carr, a democrat from Montgomery County, says you don't have to look far to see how bad the pollution is: "Last April my two sons and I volunteered on a voluntary cleanup of Rock Creek, and the volunteers collected over seven thousand plastic retail bags."

Carr and Ebbin hope the District's new law will provide momentum for theirs. But it's not the first time they've tried. Last year similar bills in Maryland and Virginia died in committee.

NPR

The Code Switch Podcast, Episode 1: Can We Talk About Whiteness?

On our inaugural episode, we're digging into how we talk about whiteness — or, really, how we don't talk about it — and hear from some folks who say it's really important that we figure out how.
NPR

'Sweetbitter' Is A Savory Saga Of Restaurant Life And Love

Oysters, cocaine, fine wine, love triangles: Stephanie Danler's debut novel Sweetbitter follows a year in the life of a young woman working at a top-tier Manhattan restaurant.
WAMU 88.5

Ralph Nader: The Future Of The Progressive Movement In The D.C. Region

Iconic consumer advocate and former presidential candidate Ralph Nader joins us for a conversation about civic engagement, the role of the media, and the future of the progressive movement in the D.C. region.

WAMU 88.5

Hillary Clinton's Emails

Hillary Clinton is under pressure after a State Department report criticized her use of a private email server: what's in the report, potential security risks and whether it could affect Secretary Clinton's bid for the White House.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.