: News

Filed Under:

Northrop Grumman To Move To D.C.

Play associated audio

By Rebecca Blatt

Defense Contractor Northrop Grumman is moving it's headquarters from Los Angeles to the D.C. area.

Northrup Grumman has more than 120,000 employees around the world, but 95 percent of its contracts come from the U.S. government, mostly for defense and intelligence work.

So after a long review, spokesman Randy Belote says, the company decided it made sense to bring its senior executives closer to their primary clients.

"This move will enhance our ability to serve the nation," says Belote. "It allows us to be more responsive to our customers."

The change will bring 300 employees to the region. Not many - when you consider the company already has approximately 40,000 in Maryland, Virginia and D.C. But Belote says the move will make an impact in local communities. He says he expects senior executives to play active roles on boards and in colleges and universities.

Belote says the company will name a specific site for the new headquarters this spring.


No Meekness Here: Meet Rosa Parks, 'Lifelong Freedom Fighter'

As the 60th anniversary of the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott approaches, author Jeanne Theoharis says it's time to let go of the image of Rosa Parks as an unassuming accidental activist.

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.
WAMU 88.5

World Leaders Meet For The UN Climate Change Summit In Paris

World leaders meet for the UN climate change summit in Paris to discuss plans for reducing carbon emissions. What's at stake for the talks, and prospects for a major agreement.


Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.