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WASHINGTON (AP) Visits to the museums of the Smithsonian Institution climbed more than 19 percent last year. Officials say the visitor counts rebounded to more than 30 million visits last year -- that's the first time that's happened since the September 11th terrorist attacks.

WASHINGTON (AP) The fur is flying over a new ad campaign by an animal rights group the White House says is using first lady Michelle Obama's image without her permission. The president of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals says her organization wouldn't have sought Mrs. Obama's consent for the anti-fur ad because it knows that she can't make such an endorsement.

WASHINGTON (AP) A D.C. Superior Court judge has ordered a police officer facing felony murder charges to remain in custody until his trial. Forty-year-old Reginald Jones of Upper Marlboro is accused of serving as lookout during an attempted robbery in southeast D.C. last month during which one of the suspects was shot and killed.

(Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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Martin Amis' 'Zone Of Interest' Is An Electrically Powerful Holocaust Novel

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NPR

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NPR

A New Campaign Ad Sport: Billionaire Bashing

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NPR

3.7 Million Comments Later, Here's Where Net Neutrality Stands

A proposal about how to maintain unfettered access to Internet content drew a bigger public response than any single issue in the Federal Communication Commission's history. What's next?

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