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D.C. Won't Suffer If International Travel Declines

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International passengers flying into Dulles are having more difficulties getting through security.
Jonathan Wilson
International passengers flying into Dulles are having more difficulties getting through security.

By Jonathan Wilson

New passenger and baggage screening rules are creating problems for some international passengers trying to catch flights to the U.S. But a transportation and public policy expert says the D.C. area may not suffer as much as other cities if international air travel declines.

Kenneth Button is a public policy professor at George Mason University who specializes in airport security. He says D.C. is unlikely to see much of a drop off in international passengers, even if some people pull back on traveling to the U.S.

"Washington does have three airports and many different destinations, people will find their way into Washington," says Button.

Nigerian student Amaka Gboneme, 24, flew into Dulles International Airport from Lagos, Nigeria, with a stop in Atlanta. She says security in Lagos was tight, but not all that different than what she's seen before.

"Everybody was a little panicky, everybody was ready to be in line, people were there on time," says Gboneme, "but mostly it was pretty...normal."

Gboneme goes back to Nigeria twice a year; she says tighter security won't change her plans.


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