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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Tuesday, January 5, 2010

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(January 5) AMBASSADOR OF CHILDREN'S BOOKS There's a new ambassador in town--the National Ambassador for Young People's Literature. Named by the Librarian of Congress for a two-year term, the ambassador for youth lit is charged with raising awareness about literacy, improving the lives of young people, and making books cool. The newest plenipotentiary of pages will be at Politics & Prose Bookstore in Northwest D.C. this afternoon at 4 p.m.

(Through January 9) A LITTLE W.I.T. Overcome one of the scariest experiences imaginable, public speaking, at "WIT," the Washington Improv Theatre. Free low-stress intro to improv workshops run 7 to 9 p.m. through Friday, and Saturday at 3 p.m. at The Children's Studio School near the U Street-Cardozo Metro. Learn the art of speaking spontaneously with confidence and humor, and how to get yourself out of bad situations and into awesome ones.

(January 9) TAPPERS WITH ATTITUDE Tappers with Attitude pound away on the stage at the Atlas Performing Arts Center on H Street Northeast for two shows Saturday at 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. The award-winning percussive dance ensemble explodes with energy during the family-friendly concerts, featuring classic tap set to traditional jazz, high-style a cappella and exuberant contemporary music.

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