: News

M.P.D. Officers To Serve Public Charter And Traditional Public Schools

Play associated audio

By Kavitha Cardoza

D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier says in the next two weeks many charter schools in the district will see uniformed police officers in and around their buildings.

The decision to have what are called 'school resource officers' in public charter schools as well as traditional public schools is part of the district's updated deployment plan. Lanier says these SROs will not search backpacks or run metal detectors: for that, schools will continue to employ security guards.

Lanier says their assignment is broader. S.R.O.'s will help mediate conflicts, visit the homes of chronic truants and build relationships with students and school administrators. Lanier says the approximately 100 officers will work with almost 90 schools based on need.

"Criminal incidents in schools is so low we couldn't use just that," says Lanier. "However there are other things we need to consider: the route kids have to take to and from school, what is the age of the kids and are there other issues we can assist with."

The charter schools' participation is voluntary.

NPR

From Sequels To Reboots, Familiar Faces Return To The Multiplex This Summer

NPR's Bob Mondello has a selective preview of summer movies from superhero blockbusters to music documentaries and everything in between.
NPR

'Sweetbitter' Is A Savory Saga Of Restaurant Life And Love

Oysters, cocaine, fine wine, love triangles: Stephanie Danler's debut novel Sweetbitter follows a year in the life of a young woman working at a top-tier Manhattan restaurant.
NPR

U.S. Intelligence Chief Warns Hackers May Be Spying On Presidential Candidates

The Director of National Intelligence says the U.S. sees signs that hackers are spying on U.S. presidential candidates. NPR explores who is doing the spying and why.
NPR

U.S. Intelligence Chief Warns Hackers May Be Spying On Presidential Candidates

The Director of National Intelligence says the U.S. sees signs that hackers are spying on U.S. presidential candidates. NPR explores who is doing the spying and why.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.