Maryland Agency Ignores New Law | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Maryland Agency Ignores New Law

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By Kavitha Cardoza

The Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration has decided not to implement a new law affecting transgender individuals. At least not for now.

Under a law scheduled to go into effect on January 1st, a person who wanted to change their gender marker on their driver's license would have had to go to court to have their birth certificate changed first.

Morgan Meneses-Sheets is executive director of Equality Maryland. She says this would have been an economic burden for transgender individuals.

"27 percent of transgender individuals make less than 20,000 dollars a year and 15 percent make less than 10,000 dollars," says Meneses-Sheets.

The current practice of allowing a change to the gender marker on a license is granted if a physicians or psychologist provides written confirmation a person is in active treatment. But the Attorney General's office says a policy update could happen at a later date.

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