: News

Filed Under:

The Environmental Protection Agency Promises To Be Tough on Pollution

Play associated audio

By Jonathan Wilson

The Environmental Protection Agency says Chesapeake Bay watershed states and D.C. could face stiffer pollution reduction requirements and other consequences for not meeting bay restoration goals.

But a leading environmental group isn't satisfied.

EPA Mid-Atlantic regional administrator Shawn Garvin is sending the letter to the District as well as six states -- including Maryland and Virginia.

Garvin says he's hopeful the consequences outlined in the letter won't be necessary.

"We have confidence in the states to meet each of these deadlines, and this provides a backstop if they don't," says Garvin.

The head of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation -- Will Baker -- says he's disappointed the stricter rules will not be applied to restoration commitments announced this past May. The EPA says it will apply the conditions to strategies still being developed.

"The EPA made announcements of what they intend to do -- we want them to show us with action," says Baker. "Show us that they are willing to stand up to reduce pollution today, and not tomorrow."

The EPA will also provide more than $11 million to states in the coming year to help with bay restoration - more than double the amount provided a year ago.

NPR

Where Jokes Go To Die, And Other Observations From Comic John Oliver

According to Oliver, the White House Correspondents' Dinner is not a good room for comedy — but that wouldn't stop him from hosting. His new show, Last Week Tonight, premiers Sunday on HBO.
NPR

Got My Goat? Vermont Farms Put Fresh Meat On Refugee Tables

Americans don't eat much barbecued goat, but the meat is a mainstay in many African, Asian and Caribbean diets. In Vermont, farmers raise for refugees and immigrants, with hopes to mainstream it.
WAMU 88.5

On National Mall, Native Americans Protest Keystone XL Pipeline

Native Americans from across the country are visiting Washington this week to protest the construction of a controversial pipeline in the Midwest.
NPR

Tech Giants Settle Class-Action Lawsuit

Apple, Google, Intel and Adobe Systems have settled a lawsuit rather than go to trial on allegations they conspired to stop high-tech workers from leaving one company for another to get a better job.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.