EagleBank Bowl Could Bring Economic Boost To D.C. | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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EagleBank Bowl Could Bring Economic Boost To D.C.

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By David Schultz

This is the second year of the EagleBank Bowl, Washington D.C.'s contribution to the college football postseason.

Perennial powerhouse UCLA will face off against the Owls of Temple University, playing in their first bowl game in 30 years.

Steve Beck, director of the D.C. Bowl Committee, says this match up is more intriguing than anything offered by that other Washington football team.

"I will say I'm a huge Redskins fan," says Beck. "But this is going to be the best football in D.C. this year. I truly believe it."

Of course, it's not just about the football. Beck says 2,000 UCLA fans from Los Angeles, along with more than 5,000 Temple fans from Philadelphia, are traveling to D.C. just for the game.He says they'll provide the city with an economic boost.

"We'll have several thousand hotel room nights here throughout the city as well as all the restaurants and the tailgate and the game itself," he says.

Kickoff at RFK is scheduled for 4:30 tomorrow afternoon.

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