: News

Filed Under:

    Civil Rights Groups Find Common Ground with Anti Gay-Marriage Group over Metro

    Play associated audio

    A protest over Metro bus ads has created common ground between gay rights advocates and a Christian coalition opposed to same-sex marriage.

    It all started with a tweet on Twitter, as so many things do. Someone from a little-known gay rights group called "Full Equality Now DC" sent a Tweet demanding Metro take down ads the group considered offensive.

    The ads, which read "Let the people vote on marriage," were bought by a Christian coalition called "Stand For Marriage DC." The group opposes gay marriage and wants to hold a city referendum on the issue.

    "If it's not lewd, pornographic or obscene then the ad will go up," says Metro spokesman Steven Taubenkibel. "Advertising on the Metro system is covered by the same First Amendment rights that cover other such communications in out society today."

    The ACLU agreed -- as did a major gay rights group in D.C. called the Gay and Lesbian Activists Alliance or GLAA. They put together a coalition of civil liberties groups and sent a letter to Metro telling it to keep the ads.

    "We are defending our own liberties," says GLAA spokesman Rick Rosendall. "We're defending our own rights. To start carving away at America's Bill of Rights is the absolute opposite of what we should be doing."

    That's just fine with Patrick Walker, a spokesman for Stand For Marriage DC.

    "I wasn't surprised at all," Walker says. "It's reasonable and therefore reasonable thinking people would know that 'Hey it's freedom of speech.'"

    Metro says it will take down the ads tonight because the contract has expired.

    NPR

    Opulent And Apolitical: The Art Of The Met's Islamic Galleries

    Navina Haidar, an Islamic art curator at the Met, says she isn't interested in ideology: "The only place where we allow ourselves any passion is in the artistic joy ... of something that's beautiful."
    NPR

    Wanted: More Bulls With No Horns

    Most U.S. dairy cows are born with horns, but most farms remove them. Animal welfare groups say dehorning is cruel. Instead, they want ranchers to breed more hornless cattle into their herds.
    NPR

    Oil Prices Tumble Again, Hurting Drillers But Helping Drivers

    Oil prices are falling, down sharply since mid-June to just over $45 a barrel. That has affected gasoline prices, now down to an average of $2.65 a gallon, about 85 cents less than a year ago.
    NPR

    Author: Tech Firms' Rhetoric Outpaces The Actual Good They Do

    Author Kentaro Toyama says despite tech firms' good intentions, using technology to solve social problems falls short. NPR's Audie Cornish talks to Toyama about his new book.

    Leave a Comment

    Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.