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Baltimore Requires Requires Faith-Based Pregnancy Centers To Advertise Services

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By Cathy Duchamp

Baltimore Jan. 1 becomes the first city in the country to require faith-based crisis pregnancy centers to post signs about the services they offer, and those they don't.Montgomery County, Maryland may follow suit.

In Baltimore they're called Crisis Pregnancy Centers. Montgomery County calls them "limited service pregnancy centers." In both cases, they're non-profits established by pro-life supporters. They provide pregnancy tests and counseling.

As of Friday, four of the centers in Baltimore will be required to post signs in English and Spanish that they don't provide birth control information or referrals for abortions. Supporters call it truth in advertising. Critics call it harassment. The Catholic Archdiocese of Baltimore has threatened to sue to stop the law from taking effect, but so far, there's been no action.

Montgomery County meantime is considering a resolution that would require limited service pregnancy centers there to tell clients that they don't provide medical advice.

Both the Baltimore and Montgomery County plans are backed by Planned Parenthood and opposed by Maryland Right to Life.

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