: News

"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Thursday, December 24, 2009

Play associated audio

It's the last day to sneak into the Smithsonian Institution Museums before they close their doors for a once-a-year, well-earned Christmas break.

(December 26 & 27) SMITHSONIAN TAKES A HOLIDAY Otherwise, you'll have to wait until the 26th to see Wapos Bay: The Hunt, a stop-motion animated movie series at the National Museum of the American Indian at Fourth Street and Independence Avenue Southwest at 12:30 and 3:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. The clay-mation kids of Wapos Bay love adventure: their playground is vast northern Saskatchewan where modern life and ancient traditions meet.

(December 26, 2009-February 25, 2010) HOLIDAY DISPLAY If you find it difficult coming down after tomorrow's Christmas present high, the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History at 14th Street and Constitution Avenue Northwest presents Holidays on Display. For those who truly cannot get enough, the exhibit is open through next February, examining the art and history of holiday parades and department store window displays.

(December 26, 28, 30) KWANZAA And the Smithsonian's Anacostia Community Museum is open for Kwanzaa, holding workshops on the holiday's guiding principles Saturday, and continuing Monday and Wednesday at the Southeast D.C. Museum at 10:30 a.m. These hands-on music, art and craft workshops are geared for the whole family, led by world-renowned music historian Brother Ah, local storytellers and other artists.

NPR

From HAL 9000 To Harley Quinn, Screen Villains Sow Chaos Because They Can

Movie heroes are fine. But let's be real — it's usually the bad guys we find most compelling.
NPR

Cookie Dough Blues: How E. Coli Is Sneaking Into Our Forbidden Snack

Most people know not to eat raw cookie dough. But now it's serious: 46 people have now been sickened with E. coli-tainted flour. Here's how contamination might be occurring.
NPR

How Is The Democratic Convention Playing In Deep-Blue Massachusetts?

Not every liberal voter had been eyeing the upcoming Democratic National Convention with uniform eagerness. NPR's Tovia Smith looks at how Democrats far from the convention floor are viewing the week.
NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.