"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Wednesday, December 23, 2009 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Wednesday, December 23, 2009

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(Through December 24) WORKHOUSE WORKS The Workhouse Arts Center is offering escape from the holiday shopping doldrums with the Workhouse Works Arts Show in Lorton, Virginia, right up to Christmas Eve. This former prison now functions as a gallery and artist studios. Its new "inmates," perpetually on parole, are creating original works for collectors and gift givers.

(December 25) CHRISTMAS ORGANS Washington National Cathedral hosts a Christmas Day organ concert Friday at 5:15 p.m. The free festivities rely on the 10,647 pipes of the organ and those of the hearty singers in the Cathedral's Great Choir.

(Through January 16) BEAUTIES AND WEEKENDS D.C.'s Hamiltonian Gallery highlights the work of two local artists through January 16th. The photographs of Frank Hallam Day make a statement with mannequins found in sub-Saharan Africa, while Jonathan Monaghan's "Rock Hard Weekend" explores the Christian notion of self-sacrifice with computer-animated videos and images.

NPR

Puerto Rico Is Sowing A New Generation Of Small Farmers

Decades of industrialization have left the island reliant on imported food. But change is coming — from government subsidies for small farmers, to classes that teach school kids how to grow food.
NPR

Puerto Rico Is Sowing A New Generation Of Small Farmers

Decades of industrialization have left the island reliant on imported food. But change is coming — from government subsidies for small farmers, to classes that teach school kids how to grow food.
NPR

A Long Way From Wax Cylinders, Library Of Congress Slowly Joins The Digital Age

Through the library's website, you listen to the recording of a former slave and millions of other items. But critics say the library needs to move more aggressively to adjust to the digital age.
NPR

A Startup Scene That's Not So Hot: Japan's Entrepreneur Shortage

A risk-averse culture is making it a tough road for fresh ideas and fledgling Japanese startups. But venture backers are starting to see some signs of hope that new tech firms will take off.

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