VA Residents Encouraged To Telecommute During Snow | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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VA Residents Encouraged To Telecommute During Snow

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By Mana Rabiee

As Virginia residents recover from this weekend's snow storm, they may want to consider doing what many government workers in the state already do -- telecommute from home. Virginia's 100,000 state employees have been encouraged for some time now to telework as much as possible, in part to alleviate the state's traffic congestion.

But despite the snow that's still on some roads no edict has been issued by the Governor for people in state government to telework today.

And there's a reason for that.

"You know, everybody already knows it."

That's Gordon Hickey, Press Secretary to Governor Kaine. He says state workers already know they can telecommute whenever possible.

And with road conditions less than perfect, even private sector employees may want to consider it today.

"Things are improving but - you know - they're not going to be up to a hundred percent. So if people can stay home and work from home, all the better for everyone," says Hickey.

Hickey expects even more state workers than usual to telework today.

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