State Cuts Could Lead To Tuition Hikes | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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State Cuts Could Lead To Tuition Hikes

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By Peter Granitz

Virginia Governor Tim Kaine proposed cutting higher education spending by more than twenty-five-percent in his final budget. University leaders are expressing their concern.

The governor hopes slashing education money will help ease a revenue shortfall of more than three billion dollars.

"George Mason has already had around forty million dollars in cuts over the last year and a half or so as it is."

That's Daniel Walsch a spokesman for George Mason University.

He says state funding and tuition are the two primary sources of revenue for the school. And the money is used to pay for everything from paying employees to powering university buildings.

"So if the state is reducing its support by any amount, and this would be a significant amount, then we have to look to tuition to maintain ourselves in order to stay above water," says Walsch.

Walsch says a possible tuition hike will be discussed in the Spring.

This is the second year in a row Kaine has proposed cuts to higher education: Last year college and university funding was cut by fifteen percent.

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