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Water Main Break In Baltimore

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Baltimore water main break floods street near Morgan State University.
Peggy Thomas
Baltimore water main break floods street near Morgan State University.

By Cathy Duchamp

In Maryland, Baltimore's Department of Public Works is lifting restrictions on water use a day after a 42-inch water main broke and flooded neighborhood streets in the northeastern part of the city.

Hours after the break, water continued to stream down a street and sidewalks near Morgan State University. Baltimore public works spokesman Kurt Kocker says patching things up is a complicated job.

"We have gas lines running through here so that makes it more difficult. We're also on top of a water treatment plant," Kocker says.

That plant had to be shut down while crews made repairs. This is the third major water main break in Baltimore in the past year.

Residents Peggy Thomas and Quintin Branch just shrug.

"How old is Baltimore, 200 years? Pipe systems are old There are so many problems I guess they didn't get to this one in time."

Water flooded some residential gas lines. A Red Cross shelter has been set up for people who don't have heat.

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