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Sec. of Education Introduces Cybersafety Booklet at D.C. Junior High

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By Jonathan Wilson

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan is introducing a new resource to help adults talk to children about cybersafety.

Some students at Jefferson Middle School in Southwest D.C. got a sneak peak.

Duncan came to Jefferson to unveil a new free booklet called "Net Cetera: Chatting with Kids About Being Online."

"I come at this less as a Secretary of Education and more as a parent," says Duncan. "Im going to take this book home and read it carefully with my wife, and figure out what we need to learn."

The 55-page booklet, created by the Federal Trade Commission, has specific advice on talking to children of different ages about things like the ramifications of social networking or messaging on mobile phones.

Sixth-grader Nisa Shelton seemed to think all adults can use a little help talking technology.

"They dont really know too much about technology," says Shelton. "Kids have more advances in technology now."

Duncan is encouraging school districts across the country to distribute copies of the booklet for parents in their communities.

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