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"Instruments In The Attic" At GMU

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John Kilkenny and the Instruments in the Attic.
Stephanie Kaye
John Kilkenny and the Instruments in the Attic.

Unused musical instruments are serving a new purpose at George Mason University. Stephanie Kaye reports on the school's "Instruments in the Attic" program.

Professor and percussionist John Kilkenny heads up Instruments in the Attic. "School systems are suffering cutbacks. And arts funding is the first thing to go, unfortunately. That's the way it is."

He smiles among stacks of trombones and shiny wooden basses. They'll be heading soon to needy students throughout Prince William and Fairfax Counties. A pair of scratched-up tubas sit at his feet. "We got a tuba in the mail - which doesn't happen every day - from Florida. An alumni from Mason heard about the program and mailed us a tuba."

About fourteen hundred people attend GMU's community arts programs. The school will be accepting donated instruments during its holiday concert on Sunday.

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