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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Weekend Events, December 11-13, 2009

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(December 12 & 13) LESOLE MAINE Lesole Maine Dance Projects brings powerful messages from the streets of South Africa to the stages of Dance Place in Northeast D.C. Saturday and Sunday. Two of their newest works, "Without a Home" and "Nna" explore the lives of kids in the streets of Johannesburg and here in the US and mix elements of African ritual with the 20th century step dance style of African American college students.

(December 13) FAMILY SINGS If you find it hard to sit quietly in your seat without bursting into song, the Strathmore Family Sings! allows you to exercise those vocal chords. The seasonal sing-along kicks off at 4 p.m. Sunday at The Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda.

(December 15-January 10) YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN If you're a little "holiday'd" out, escape from the Nutcrackers and Sugar Plum Fairies can be found during Young Frankenstein opening Tuesday night at 7:30 in the Kennedy Center Opera House. The new musical is based on the Oscar-nominated 1974 film, patching together Mary Shelley's classic tale with Mel Brooks' comic genius.


No Meekness Here: Meet Rosa Parks, 'Lifelong Freedom Fighter'

As the 60th anniversary of the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott approaches, author Jeanne Theoharis says it's time to let go of the image of Rosa Parks as an unassuming accidental activist.

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.
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World Leaders Meet For The UN Climate Change Summit In Paris

World leaders meet for the UN climate change summit in Paris to discuss plans for reducing carbon emissions. What's at stake for the talks, and prospects for a major agreement.


Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

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