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Search For Answers In Case Of American Muslim Terror Suspects Continues

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By Jonathan Wilson

The search for local clues in the case of five American Muslims from D.C. area recently arrested in Pakistan continues.

Ramy Zamzam, one of the men arrested in Pakistan, lived in the Murraygate Village apartment complex with his parents and younger brother.

Matilda Antwi says she lives directly above the Zamzams: she says Ramy always seemed polite. "He's very quiet, he don't say much," says Antwi. "I know he goes to school, but I have never said a word to him," Antwi says.

The local chapter of the Islamic Circle of North America is just a few miles away. It's where Zamzam and the four other young men reportedly prayed each day.

The local chapter is headquartered at a converted residence. The tan-brick building was locked today as worshipers arrived for midday prayers.

This afternoon, ICNA's leaders posted a statement on the group's website, saying in part: "Extremism has no place in Islam," and "We stand beside local and federal law enforcement and hope that this matter is resolved very soon."

The Islamic Circle of North America was established in 1968.

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