: News

Filed Under:

Hate Crimes Coalition Split Over Cardin Bill

Play associated audio

By Rebecca Sheir

A bill co-sponsored by Senator Ben Cardin (D-MD) would count crimes against homeless people as hate crimes.

But members of a national coalition against hate crimes are split on the issue.

The FBI tracks hate crimes committed on the basis of a person's race, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, disability, gender and gender identity, plus crimes committed by juveniles and against juveniles.

But Michael Lieberman, co-chair of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights Hate Crimes Task Force says homelessness is different.

"Homelessness is not an immutable characteristic," he notes. "Society is actively trying to end homelessness.

Lieberman, who serves as Washington counsel for the Anti-Defamation League, opposes Cardin's act. Fellow Task Force member Neil Donovan, who directs the National Coalition for the Homeless, supports it.

"I think hate crimes are crimes against an individual because of what they represent to another person," he says. "And we have countless examples of people assaulted based solely on the fact that the person either believed that the person was homeless or knew them to be homeless."

Maryland, D.C. and Maine already have extended hate crime protection to homeless people. The Senate Judiciary Committee is scheduled to take up Cardin's bill Thursday.

NPR

Comparing Both Conventions As TV: Did Either One Get An Edge?

Now that the national conventions have concluded, NPR TV critic Eric Deggans looks back on both, judging them purely as television programs. Policy aside, did either convention make for compelling TV?
NPR

Salvage Supperclub: A High-End Dinner In A Dumpster To Fight Food Waste

The ingredients — think wilted basil, bruised plums, garbanzo bean water — sound less than appetizing. Whipped together, they're a tasty meal that show how home cooks can use often-tossed foods.
NPR

LISTEN: At The DNC, We Asked Women Why They Were Voting For Clinton

We asked women — as young as 4 and as old as 77 — how much the weight of history factored into their decision.
NPR

How Your Health Data Lead A Not-So-Secret Life Online

Apps can make managing health care a lot easier, but most don't have the privacy protections required of doctors and hospitals. And a simple Web search can clue in advertisers to health concerns.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.