D.C. Public Schools Continue Their Upward Trend In Math Scores | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Public Schools Continue Their Upward Trend In Math Scores

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D.C. Chancellor Michelle Rhee.
Kavitha Cardoza
D.C. Chancellor Michelle Rhee.

By Kavitha Cardoza

According to the latest federal report card, D.C. public schools continue their upward trend in math scores, both at the fourth and eighth grade level.

The National Assessment of Educational Progress shows students in D.C. continue to improve in math. Since 2007, the fourth grade average scores increased by six points while at the eighth grade, there's a seven point bump.

D.C. was the only large district to grow more than five points both years. D.C has been improving since 2003. While D.C. Schools Chancellor Michelle Rhee says it's important to acknowledge they system is building on a foundation already laid, she says there is a difference. "What you see this year is growth that is larger than you've seen in the past and second, it is out of step with the rest of the nation and the rest of the cities, which essentially stayed flat," says Rhee.

This is the first year charter schools have not been included in the report card.

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