: News

"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Tuesday, December 8, 2009

Play associated audio

(DECEMBER 8) OVER THE RHINE If you want to check out an alternative take on folk music tomorrow night, the Sixth & I Historic Synagogue hosts Over the Rhine. This husband and wife duo draws from the Great American Songbook and the annals of traditional folk.

(December 10) TOO HOT TO HANDEL Too Hot to Handel turns up the temperature on the "Messiah" at The Music Center at Strathmore Thursday night in North Bethesda. Under the baton of Marin Alsop, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra performs a popular reinterpretation of Handel's classic oratorio, blending traditional meter with jazz, gospel and R&B. If you miss Thursday's performance there are two more on Saturday and Sunday nights at the BSO's home in Baltimore.

(Through February 28) THE CORNARO MISSAL In the hustle and bustle of the holidays, many people forget what Christmas is all about. Not The Walters Art Museum, presenting The Christmas Story: Picturing the Birth of Christ in Medieval Manuscripts in Baltimore's Mount Vernon neighborhood, on display through February 28th. From lowly stables to angelic announcements, the story of Jesus was captured by 16th century illustrators and is now in the Walters for families to peruse, ponder and enjoy.


From Trembling Teacher To Seasoned Mentor: How Tim Gunn Made It Work

Gunn, the mentor to young designers on Project Runway, has been a teacher and educator for decades. But he spent his childhood "absolutely hating, hating, hating, hating school," he says.

How Do We Get To Love At 'First Bite'?

It's the season of food, and British food writer Bee Wilson has a book on how our food tastes are formed. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with her about her new book, "First Bite: How We Learn to Eat."

Osceola At The 50-Yard Line

The Seminole Tribe of Florida works with Florida State University to ensure it that its football team accurately presents Seminole traditions and imagery.

Reviving Payoff For Prediction – Of Terrorism Risk

Could an electronic market where people bet on the likelihood of attacks deter terrorism? NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about the potential for a terror prediction market.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.