: News

Filed Under:

Med Students Learn The Stories Behind The Stats

Play associated audio

By Rebecca Sheir

There are roughly 11,000 homeless people in the D.C. area. But students at Georgetown Medical School are learning the stories behind the statistics.

David Pirtles story goes like this. He developed schizophrenia in his late twenties, and wound up on the streets of D.C., until he was arrested for stealing smoked salmon from a museum gift shop. And it was the greatest day of my life because it was the first time that anybody realized that I needed help, he says.

Pirtle recently spoke to a classroom full of first-year med students at Georgetown. It's part of a new program to teach future doctors like Sanna Ronkainen about the different populations they might one day serve.

"D.C. does have such a large homeless population," Ronkainen notes. "And we see a lot of statistics, or we see people sitting on the street but you don't talk to them? So I think its been good to put a face on a concept."

Homeless advocates say Georgetown is the first medical school to use this kind of curriculum to bring the two groups face to face.

NPR

'NeuroTribes' Examines The History — And Myths — Of The Autism Spectrum

Steve Silberman talks about how Nazi extermination plans and a discredited scientific paper about childhood vaccines shaped our current understanding of autism.
WAMU 88.5

The Democracy Of The Diner (Rebroadcast)

Whether the decor is faux '50s silver and neon or authentic greasy spoon, diners are classic Americana, down to the familiar menu items. Rich, poor, black, white--all rub shoulders in the vinyl booths and at formica counters. We explore the enduring appeal and nostalgia of the diner.

NPR

Hillary Clinton's Fight For Gefilte Fish

Among the thousands Hillary Clinton's emails released this week, there was a particularly fishy one.
WAMU 88.5

Environmental Outlook: How To Build Smarter Transportation And More Livable Cities

A new report says traffic in the U.S. is worse than it's been in years. But some say there are reasons to be optimistic. For this month's Environmental Outlook: How revitalized urban centers and new modes of transportation are changing how we get around our cities.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.