: News

Filed Under:

Med Students Learn The Stories Behind The Stats

Play associated audio

By Rebecca Sheir

There are roughly 11,000 homeless people in the D.C. area. But students at Georgetown Medical School are learning the stories behind the statistics.

David Pirtles story goes like this. He developed schizophrenia in his late twenties, and wound up on the streets of D.C., until he was arrested for stealing smoked salmon from a museum gift shop. And it was the greatest day of my life because it was the first time that anybody realized that I needed help, he says.

Pirtle recently spoke to a classroom full of first-year med students at Georgetown. It's part of a new program to teach future doctors like Sanna Ronkainen about the different populations they might one day serve.

"D.C. does have such a large homeless population," Ronkainen notes. "And we see a lot of statistics, or we see people sitting on the street but you don't talk to them? So I think its been good to put a face on a concept."

Homeless advocates say Georgetown is the first medical school to use this kind of curriculum to bring the two groups face to face.

NPR

How Mike Birbiglia Applies 'Yes, And ...' To Improv And Beyond

Birbiglia's new film follows a fictional New York improv troupe. Don't Think Twice explores the tension between personal ambition and being an "endlessly generous" team player.
NPR

Scraped, Splattered — But Silent No More. Finally, The Dinner Plate Gets Its Say

Instagram is the Internet's semi-obsessive, borderline-creepy love letter to food. But behind every great meal is a plate doing a pretty-OK job. So a comedian made an Instagram to celebrate plates.
NPR

Post Republican Convention Wrap-Up: Did The Party Make Progress On Unity?

The Republican National Convention wrapped up on Thursday. Ron Elving was there, and tells NPR's Scott Simon about the ups and downs of the four day meeting.
NPR

Making The Cloud Green: Tech Firms Push For Renewable Energy Sources

Few people can demand what kind of electricity they get. But Microsoft and Facebook, which operate huge, power-hungry data centers, are trying to green up the electricity grid with their buying power.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.