"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Thursday, December 4, 2009 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Thursday, December 4, 2009

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(December 5, 6, 11, 12 & 13) THE CHRISTMAS REVELS The Washington Revels are back with their annual Christmas festival at Lisner Auditorium in D.C.'s Foggy Bottom tomorrow through the 13th. his time 'round the revelers travel to Renaissance Italy, staging their stories and music in the workshop of Leonardo da Vinci with the Renaissance band Piffaro and a Roman festival celebrating the gods of harvest.

(December 5) HILLS OF HOME Legendary guitarist Doc Watson performs in Fairfax, Virginia at George Mason University's Center for the Arts tomorrow night at 8 p.m. Watson brings his flat-picking ways to the stage along with his grandson Richard Watson and banjo player David Holt for Hills of Home, a concert showcasing some of the best Appalachian music around.

(December 5) SILVER BELLS IN SILVER SPRING Silver bells are ringing in Silver Spring during the ArtSpring Gallery's holiday events tomorrow from noon to 4 p.m. Providing a venue for locally made trinkets and treats, ArtSpring hosts an ornament making workshop for children of all ages, along with live jazz by Silver Spring-based band Icarus. Creations will be hung on the community Christmas tree at Ellsworth Drive Plaza.

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