: News

Filed Under:

Store Brand Baby Formula Maker Wins False Advertising Lawsuit

Play associated audio

By Matt McCleskey

A baby-formula manufacturer in Virginia has won a $13.5 million verdict in a false-advertising lawsuit filed against a rival. PBM Products is based in Gordonsville, Virginia. It makes store-brand baby formula sold in 35,000 retail locations worldwide, including WalMart, Target, and Walgreens stores.

In April, the company filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Richmond against Mead Johnson & Co., the maker of the Enfamil brand of baby formula. PBM alleged that in direct mailings to 1.6 million health-care professionals, Mead Johnson falsely claimed that PBM's products don't provide the same nutrition as Enfamil.

In a statement, PBM's CEO says the jury's decision shows any ads indicating the cheaper store-brands are a cutback in nutrition are false.

A spokesman for Mead Johnson tells the Charlottesville Daily Progress newspaper the direct mail ad was pulled six months ago and says his company's marketing efforts will continue to focus on its products, rather than on its competitors.

NPR

Barbershop: UofL Basketball Ban, Football Concussions And The NFL Women's Summit

ESPN contributor Kevin Blackistone, Bloomberg View's Kavitha Davidson and The Washington Post's Wesley Lowery talk about the UofL basketball team, public opinion of the NFL, and women in sports.
NPR

After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
NPR

On The Clock: Rubio Gets The Most Talking Time In Tonight's Debate

It was the last debate before the New Hampshire primary and Donald Trump was back onstage. Which GOP candidate ended up with the most talking time?
NPR

How Limited Internet Access Can Subtract From Kids' Education

Smartphones are often credited with helping bridge the "digital divide" between people who do and don't have Internet access at home. But is mobile Internet enough for a family with a kid in school?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.