Public Asked To Comment On Spring Valley Clean Up Options | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Public Asked To Comment On Spring Valley Clean Up Options

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By Kavitha Cardoza

The Army Corps of Engineers has released a list of chemical warfare materials recovered from Spring Valley in northwest D.C. Now, residents are being asked to comment on the cleanup process.

The list includes 75-milimeter projectiles of Lewisite and mustard gas, which are blistering agents as well as partial grenades and shrapnel. The Corps is asking residents to comment on four possible cleanup options within the next month.

They recommend destroying the munitions on site using explosives and chemical neutralization in a sealed container. The Corps says that option is safer than transporting the materials off site. It'll cost approximately $500,000.

For more than 15 years the Corps has been cleaning areas in the Spring Valley neighborhood where World War I toxic munitions were buried by the Army and accidentally uncovered by residents and workers decades later.

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