: News

Filed Under:

Catholic Archdiocese Looks For Compromise In Same-Sex Marriage

Play associated audio

By Sabri Ben-Achour

The D.C. Council has taken its first of two votes on the issue of allowing same-sex marriage in the nation's capital, passing the bill 11 to 2.

One of the most prominent opponents of legalizing same sex marriage has been the Catholic Archdiocese of Washington. It's said it would be unable to continue contracting social services with the city under the proposed bill if doing so would require it to provide spousal benefits or adoptive services to same sex couples.

"We're really just asking is that within our own organization that we may follow the teachings of our faith," says spokeswoman Susan Gibbs.

Legislators have suggested that the Church do what Georgetown University does- offer benefits to an employee and one other designated adult whether it be a grandmother or a husband. But the church has rejected that idea. Councilman Tommy Wells has said, in effect, let them.

"There are other contractors. They also provide services to the same residents in the District, They do not ask to be exempt from any DC laws," says Wells.

Discussions so far have not yielded any concrete results, but are ongoing.

WAMU 88.5

Anne Tyler: "A Spool Of Blue Thread" (Rebroadcast)

In her first live radio interview ever, Pulitzer Prize winning author Anne Tyler joins Diane to talk about her 20th novel, "A Spool of Blue Thread."


Scotch Whiskey Gets A Run For Its Money From Global Distillers

A Canadian company recently was named whiskey of the year — knocking Scotch brands from the top-five category. In the U.S., there's been a massive increase in single malts in particular.

Frustrated With GOP Candidates, Muslims Recall More Welcoming Days

Many Muslim-Americans say the current political climate is worse than the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks. Many Muslims who once voted Republican, say don't feel like they have a home in that party.

From Takeout To Breakups: Apps Can Deliver Anything, For A Price

Convenience is at an all-time premium — and a lot of smartphone apps promise to make many of the things we do every day easier. In a time-crunch or sheer laziness, how far will the apps take us?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.