: News

Filed Under:

Laid Off D.C. Teachers Want New Leadership For Teacher's Union

Play associated audio

By Kavitha Cardoza

Some teachers in D.C. Public Schools who were laid off say there should be a change in leadership at the Washington Teacher's Union.

Crystal Proctor, a former DCPS teacher, uses words such as "ridiculous" and "terrible" to describe watching the union attorneys in court, as they tried unsuccessfully to persuade a judge to reinstate laid off teachers. Proctor says the union has not been proactive enough and wants to see a change at the top. "Someone who's not afraid of Michelle Rhee," says Proctor. "Someone who's going to stand up to her and stand up for us." Some teachers spoke of not getting information from their representatives, while others say the union should pay for private attorneys.

George Parker, president of the Washington Teachers Union, says they organized a rally, met several times with teachers and went to court to try and stop the layoffs-- something he says hasn't been done in the past. Parker says understandably teachers are upset. But as for teachers asking for a change in leadership, "I don't even want to discuss that yet. I mean we have too much work to worry about that," says Parker. "I think a lot of what you're seeing is the political posturing that takes place in the WTU. I think it's unfortunate but that's what happens."

Teachers can still file individual appeals with the Office of Employee Appeals.


New York's Museum Of Modern Art Acquires Original Emoji

NPR's Robert Siegel speaks with Paola Antonelli, senior curator at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, about the museum's recent acquisition of the original emoji for its permanent collection.

Technology May Rescue Male Baby Chicks From The Grinder

The egg industry may soon eliminate a wasteful — and to some, horrifying — practice: slaughtering male chicks. New technology can identify male embryos in eggs before they enter incubation chambers.

What Trump And Clinton Have To Say About Education

The candidates aren't talking much about education, but the next president faces big challenges: reducing achievement gaps, implementing the new education law, and expanding access and opportunity.

A Moment Of Silence For The Black And Brown Talent That Grew On Vine

We'll miss Vine, but not just for its goofy, raw, six-second looped videos. We'll miss the platform for its ability to incubate young black talent.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.