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D.C. Council Votes In Favor Of Bill That Would Recognize Same-Sex Marriage

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By Sabri Ben-Achour

The D.C. Council has voted in favor of a bill that would recognize same sex marriage. The 11 to 2 vote brings D.C. one step closer to legalizing gay marriage. There's one remaining final vote in two weeks and the mayor has to sign off on it.

Longtime gay rights advocate Peter Rosenstein said the council's action was was a victory for equality. "This was a fight for our own rights, and it was an honor to be in the room when the council voted this way," says Rosenstein.

Bishop Harry Jackson has long opposed the bill. He and others are vowing to continue a legal battle to put the question to a popular vote. "We have an uphill battle, but I think the courts will give us the opportunity to have the people decide, so it's not over until the choir lady sings," says Jackson.

If the bill passes a final vote December 15th, it could go into effect in February, making D.C. the sixth jurisdiction in the U.S. to legalize gay marriage.

Council members Yvette Alexander and Marion Barry opposed the bill.

NPR

Cult Survivor Documents 2 Decades Inside 'Holy Hell'

Will Allen directed the documentary Holy Hell, which depicts his experience as a videographer and member of The Buddhafield cult. Allen used his own footage, as well as his interviews with other former members, to make this documentary.
NPR

Evaporated Cane Juice? Puh-leeze. Just Call It Sugar, FDA Says

Companies cultivating a healthful image often list "evaporated cane juice" in their products' ingredients. But the FDA says it's really just sugar, and that's what food labels should call it.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour - May 27, 2016

Congress votes to override DC's 2013 ballot initiative on budget autonomy. Virginia governor faces a federal investigation over international finance and lobbying rules. And DC, Maryland and Virginia move to create a Metro safety oversight panel.

NPR

After Departure Of Uber, Lyft In Austin, New Companies Enter The Void

Earlier this month, voters in Austin, Texas, rejected an effort to overturn the city's rules for ride-hailing companies. Uber and Lyft tried to prevent fingerprinting of their drivers, and now both have left town. A few other ride-share companies have popped up to help fill the void. NPR explores how people are getting around town without Uber and Lyft.

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