Humanist Group Launches 'No God' Campaign On D.C. Buses | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Humanist Group Launches 'No God' Campaign On D.C. Buses

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By Mana Rabiee

The D.C. based American Humanist Association has launched a nationwide ad campaign -- just in time for Christmas.

The group has commissioned 200 ads located on DC city buses with images of smiling people wearing Santa hats and a large caption that asks "No God?...No Problem!"

"It's something that you don't talk about," says spokesman Roy Speckhardt.

He says the campaign is part of their long-term goal to remove the stigma of atheistic ideas.

"The idea that somebody could not believe in God is just -- it's swept under the rug -- and this takes it out from under the rug and says 'Hey, you know, this is an option that you can have'."

Passengers at a bus stop on U-Street in Northwest DC had mixed reactions to the ad.

"It's very very sad because God is here all the time," says one woman.

"I think especially at this time it just doesn't seem to make a lot of sense." says one bus rider.

Another rider says, "it doesn't make me feel bad. It wouldn't stop my belief."

"If that's what they want to do, until further notice, you know, allow them their space."

Next month, the campaign extends to New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and San Francisco.

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