: News

Filed Under:

Struggling Saab Got Its Start In East Coast Cities Like D.C.

Play associated audio
General Motors is considering shutting down Saab if it can't find a buyer.
www.flickr.com/exfordy
General Motors is considering shutting down Saab if it can't find a buyer.

By Mana Rabiee

General Motors may shut down its Swedish unit Saab if it can't find a buyer soon.

In the parking lot of Saab International Motors in Falls Church, Virginia, Jim Sisson and his wife, of White Plains, Maryland, shop for their sixth Saab. "My wife and I have owned, one, two, three, four, five," says Sisson.

General Manager Tim Whalen has been selling Saabs since 1971. He says the car maker made its niche in cities like Boston and D.C., where uber-educated drivers wanted a luxury car that wasn't pompous.

"The primary market for Saabs for years has been on the east coast. It's always done very well in the Washington area," says Whalen.

Whalen says he's checking Google news and fan-based sites to get info and consumer feedback about the latest news on the fate of Saab.

NPR

Comic-Con Fans Continue The Epic Battle Between Science And Fiction

Fans of science fiction have long wrestled with the question of just how much science should be in their fiction. Advocates of different approaches met at San Diego's Comic-Con.
NPR

Scraped, Splattered — But Silent No More. Finally, The Dinner Plate Gets Its Say

Instagram is the Internet's semi-obsessive, borderline-creepy love letter to food. But behind every great meal is a plate doing a pretty-OK job. So a comedian made an Instagram to celebrate plates.
NPR

Leaked Democratic Party Emails Show Members Tried To Undercut Sanders

Just days before the Democratic National Committee convention gets underway, WikiLeaks releases almost 20,000 emails among DNC staff, revealing discussions of topics from Bernie Sanders to the media.
NPR

Making The Cloud Green: Tech Firms Push For Renewable Energy Sources

Few people can demand what kind of electricity they get. But Microsoft and Facebook, which operate huge, power-hungry data centers, are trying to green up the electricity grid with their buying power.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.