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Local Saab Dealer Won't Sing Sob Story

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By Mana Rabiee

When the recession hit Saab International Motors in Falls Church, Virginia, they started selling just five or six cars a month.

Then came news the potential sale of Saab to a prospective buyer fell through. "When the announcement first came out it certainly was unsettling," says Tim Whalen, general manager.

That's because GM may decide to kill the popular Swedish boutique brand all together, leaving Whalen, who's been selling Saabs since 1971, with no more new cars to sell.

But if GM decides to shut it down, "I can tell you that we'll still be here," says Whalen. "We'll still be servicing Saabs. We'll be selling pre-owned Saabs."

Two new prospective buyers have come forward, including a firm from China.


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