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Saving during the Holidays: It can be done

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By Sabri Ben-Achour

Holiday shopping is a tradition in and of itself, but many Americans say they want to cut back this year.

At the Pentagon City Mall, in Northern Virginia -- one Holiday Shopper named Bob is thinking about his Holiday budget.

"We always set one, and we always go over it. I always go over what I tell my wife," he says. "There's always subterfuge in marriage, you have to have that."

Well, there are a few ways, according to experts, to successfully reign in holiday spending. Bill Hampel is with the Credit Union National Association. He says just verbalizing the intention to save will help.

"Among your family talk about what you plan to do, think a bit about what you do before going to the store," Hampel says.

Marshall Cohen is chief Retail Analyst at NPD group - a market research firm.

"Stick to the list - make it, check it twice, don't deviate from it," Cohen says. And if you're really looking to save money, don't buy for yourself while you're out there shopping for everybody else."

But those tips aside, there are times when you should buy. Inventories are low this year, so Cohen says: if you see a deal, grab it.

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